Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
STATION
KQED (PBS) 23
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 2:30pm PST
increasing education. very educated people tend to not like trial and error. productivity drops and the rate of innovation drops. tavis: you mentioned the uk. how does this notion of "antifragile" apply in a place like egypt right now? >> the way i was complaining about egypt before the arab spring. when you suppress political life -- political life loves volatility. switzerland is a perfect place where you have volatility at the municipal level, but nothing of talk. the exact perfect on stable system is like saudi arabia or egypt. egypt before the arab spring, we had no information for 40 years. no information. a system artificially stabilized and you have hidden risks under the surface and you do not know what they are. that is what happened with the arab spring and now we are seeing things and it may turn into a total mess. the system is fragile last by depriving it from some rigid depriving it of political ofatility -- depriving it political volatility. tavis: doesn't always lead to greater strength? >> you want to -- does it always lead to greater strength? >> you want to favor the syst
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 4:00pm PST
that the states get for that deregulation will go to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. depende
PBS
Nov 28, 2012 6:00pm PST
to utilize their talents and the education they have received is to give them a legal status. >> suarez: the bill would to grant legal residence for those who pursue higher education or serve the u.s. military. unlike the "dream act," which failed to get through congress, the "achieve act" would not provide a path to full citizenship. and that is a sticking point for most democrats. new jersey senator bob menendez: >> they call it the achieve act. the problem with the achieve act is that it does not achieve the dream of the young people who aspire to fully participate in american life. who only know one flag that they pledge allegiance to, that is the flag of the united states. >> suarez: still, senator kyl said tuesday, the republican bill can be a first step toward broader measures. >> it will begin the discussion. and it may be that it will lead to a series of smaller steps next year rather than comprehensive reform. on the other hand i suspect that the president and others may want to put comprehensive reform on the table. but either way i think focusing on certain specific issues l
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 3:00pm PST
worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti mission here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of entrenched poverty. many of these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national priorities for the rebuilding. that
PBS
Nov 29, 2012 12:00am PST
, he became very much involveed in the way people with down syndrome are educated and set up something called the cook center. and i said when i interviewed them, "you spent so much time and effort on this, do you wish it had never happened? do you wish your son didn't have down syndrome? do you wish you never heard of that?" and his mother said to me, for david, i wish he didn't have down syndrome. and for david i would like to make his life easier and it's a hard way to be in the world. speaking for myself, i never would have believed 30 years ago i could say such a thing, it has so enriched my life and made me think so much more deeply for important things speaking for myself i wouldn't give it up for anything in the world. >> rose: what are those important things? >> i think the sense of the enormous diversity of human experience. i think the sense, also, in s regard, that everyone seems to be so unlike, one's experience in life is often of feeling alienated by people. coming to terms way child who is so different opens one up to the possibility that everyone has a lot in common. a
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 3:00pm PST
. federal education officials announced today that five states will participate in an experiment to make students spend more time in school. meanwhile, many states are already implementing a new national approach, called the "common core state standards." special correspondent elizabeth brackett of public television station wttw reports on how that's working out in chicago. reporter: chicago elementary school students have walked these stairs for more than 100 years. named for the meat-packing tycoon this chicago public school is now 87% hispanic. like many inner-city schools it is on academic probation. >> you're going to write the main idea of the story on one post-it note. then you're going to rip off another. you're just going to write two character traits. >> reporter: but now this school is on the cutting edge of the biggest change in american education in years. it is one of a small group of chicago schools that is testing the new common course state standards. so far 46 states have adopted the standards which describe what every student needs to know from kindergarten through 12t
PBS
Nov 28, 2012 4:00pm PST
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ - hi, neighbour! come on in! i can't wait to go play at jungle beach today! and... prince wednesday's here! - hello, hello, hello. it's me, prince wednesday. i have my ro
PBS
Nov 29, 2012 3:00pm PST
skills as part of their regular examinations. the "newshour's" special correspondent for education, john merrow, has the story. >> hi, how are you. >> tell me shadman's birthday. >> reporter: today, two-year-old shadman uddin is here for his routine check up. his pediatrician, dr. cindy osman, checks his eyes, ears and heart, but that's not all. >> so tell me what kinds of things he says these days? >> juice, water. >> great. does he ever put words together? give me some examples of times he puts words together. >> mommy and umara do this. >> okay, so he's doing great with his language. >> my role is to help parents parent more effectively. how to connect with their kids more effectively, what kinds of activities they can do that will better stimulate their cognitive development and get them better prepared for doing better in school. >> reporter: she's a new breed of pediatrician. part doctor, part teacher. >> you can see a lot in how they handle a book. you can check out their fine motor skills. so i'm both checking their development and i'm getting a sense of how frequently they're re
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 3:00pm PST
when are you dealing with it. that is the reason why educating and getting people to be tested, to identify whether they are infected or not and to counsel them if they are not infected and get them into a care treatment program, if they written effected is so terribly important. >> a lot of reasons to be encouraged and a lot of challenges ahead. dr. anthony fauci thanks for joining us. >> you're welcome. you can see my interview, how to survive the plague. plus we ask journalist john cohen to take stock of the latest aids development. >> brown: and that brings us to the analysis of shields and brooks-- syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. so david, where are we on this cliff, over, under, sideways. >> we're going backwards. i guess that is a good thing. >> backing away would be good. >> we're going towards the cliff. >> and so what happened is the election happened. obama wins. clearly he ran on raising tax or raising revenue from the top 2%. center piece. republicans are not stupid. they sort of understand that. so they went through a
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 7:00pm PST
. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> because i use a lot of humorous stories in the speeches i give, i am often asked: what if you don't have much of a sense of humor? i think we all have the capability to enjoy humor. i also know lots of things get in the way: stressful and exacting jobs, maybe health problems you have or someone close to you has. those are real and they can be barriers. that said, i can't think of anything that keeps life in perspective more than cultivating and using a sense of humor. i remember my mother and dad saying this about someone they admired: he's cool, calm, and collected. i think those three apply to well-placed humor, too. cool brings a burst of fresh air into situations that can get overheated. calm: it's hard to be funny and angry at the same time. if you are both, that's sarcasm. collected: the shortest distance between two people is a smile. we collect more allies with smiles than with frowns. longtime newsman david brinkley once said, a successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with bricks others have thrown at him. maybe having
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 12:00am PST
exaggerated at least i think his father behaved disgracefully. he had an expensive oxford education but purposefully denied it to young winston. >> purposefully, for what reason. >> partly money. he was very conscious of the expense of sending winston to oxford. he suggested that the army was a more suitable career and then tried to bargain with him not to go to the cavalry, that might be too expensive there. that wasn't all together an easy relationship. >> but he sold to to winston churchill by saying you can be a great man of the army. >> he did. he tried to. >> he later discovered that he really was too stupid to go to the bar. he was very disappointed, that he thought his father thought he was, you know, was going to be successing -- --. >> rose: found out his father thought he was too stupid. >> his father was dismissive. >> horrid to him. >> winston always wanted his father's affection. even a poignant story late in his life after the second world war where he had had all these accomplishments where winston has this supposedly dream moment where his father comes back and wins
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 12:00pm PST
four let's make sure that we're making the kind of investments in education and work force development, energy independence, infrastructure and research and development that ensures that we're innovating as we have in the past. >> rose: julianna goldman of bloomberg joins me from washington and she interviewed president obama on tuesday. that was an excerpt from her interview and i'm pleased to have her on this program. and congratulations first of all. >> charlie thanks very much. it was a great opportunity. >> rose: tell me how you found the president. not in terms of the sort of term temperment in terms of where his mind is set at this moment. >> there was a little bit of chitchat before we started the interview and i had the opportunity to congratulate him for the first time since his election. and i said you've been a little busy. he said yes no trip to disneyworld for me. so he seemed a little tired. he seemed a little frustrated at the pace of how these negotiations are going. but he also came across as the cool, calm, no drama obama that we've come to know from him as a candi
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)